Posts Tagged ‘Human Trafficking’

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I have been thinking about writing this for a long time but never had the time until now.

What is love?
1 in 4 women are sexually abused.
Every 2 minutes someone is sexually assaulted.
What is love?

7% of girls in middle school say they have been sexually abused.
12% of girls in high school say they have been sexually abused.
What is love?

If 1 in 4 women being sexually abused is considered love, then love is dark and sick. Love should just be considered a man dripping with lust, sneaking, manipulating, and attacking, innocent young women. If that is love, I want no part of it.

Statistics say 97% of people have sex before they get married.
50% of marriages end in divorce.
What is love?

In the year 2013 their is an estimated 1,671,257,652 pornography searches on the internet.
97 Billion dollars of revenue is collected each year for pornography.
What is love?

If this was law I could beg the theory that love is represented by sex. That is all men and women want. If almost everybody is looking for love and 97% have found it in sex, then that must be the key to love and happiness. However, divorce is running rampant. If a male or a female, can’t wait to have sex with you until marriage, what makes him or her have the self control to have sex with someone else. What is love?

Love is looking more and more like unhappiness, failed marriages, abuse, and rape. Our culture idolizes love so much, we worship artists and celebrities like Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry, Kim Kardashian, only because they take their clothes off. What is love?

What is love?
Love is a pure love. An unconditional love. A steadfast love. A caring love. One that cherishes her heart first, above all else. One that will not take advantage of her, one that will protect her, one that will fight for her, stay up late talking with her. Not one who manipulates her, not one who makes her fear for their relationship, and not one who leaves her. That is love!
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http://www.familysafemedia.com/pornography_statistics.html
http://www.covenanteyes.com/pornstats/
http://www.trustmattersmost.com/news/divorce-rates-in-2013-a-look-forward-and-a-look-back/
http://waitingtillmarriage.org/4-cool-statistics-about-abstinence-in-the-usa/
http://www.rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-victims
http://www.oneinfourusa.org/statistics.php

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http://www.kptm.com/story/17802759/human-trafficking-exists-in-nebraska

Nicole Ebat

OMAHA(KPTM)–There are at least two thousand people in Nebraska who are forced to work as prostitutes. That’s according to research from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.

Lawmakers say one of the biggest obstacles in helping these people is that the public doesn’t know–or believe–that people are sold for sex. Many have a hard time believing it happens right at home in Nebraska.

But one woman knows all too well that it doesn’t happen–and that it can happen anywhere.

Long, mottled scars running from her inner thigh down her leg are the only physical marks left you can see. Jane* was raped, beaten and threatened with her life every day in the west African country she was born in.

So when a man offered her romance, marriage and a better life in America, she went with him.

“He told me he was going to marry me. When he married me, I would become a better person,” she said. “He told me that ‘if you stay in this country they are going to catch you, they will find you so I am going to help you. Then I said ‘ok, I’m happy'”

The man, known to Jane as Mike, smuggled her out of Africa, but once the plane landed on American soil:

“When we came in he totally changed. These men would come sleep with me. I didn’t know how to speak the English. I would just say why why why? They would say shhh… you know? They do that then they go. It’s so shameful,” she explained.

The man kept her locked in a basement, away from the outside world. He told her police would take her back to her country where she would be killed if she ever left.

She has no idea how long she was in captivity. She doesn’t know how many men there were. She didn’t even know she was doing it for money.

“You don’t know somebody. That person will come, different different people will come have sex with you. That is bad. I didn’t want it. I would have rather died in my country than have somebody else have sex with me when I’m not ready and I don’t even know you. Not him alone that brought me, but somebody else I don’t know. More than one, two or three. I was going to kill me if I [had] any way to kill myself at that time when I was with him I would have done it,” she said stoically.

Jane’s story is just one of what could be hundreds of thousands across the country.

The experts have a hard time putting an exact number on how many victims like Jane could be out there.

“The thing about people who are traffickers, the predators, they are very adept at psychological mind games,” said Linda Burkle with the Salvation Army’s Wellspring Program which helps victims of human trafficking. “Most of the young ladies I have worked with that were trafficked did not see themselves as being trafficked. This was their boyfriend, this was the love of their life. They would do anything for him,”

Some studies suggest there are at least 200,000 minors alone being trafficked in the United States.

Lawmakers say it’s difficult to know for certain partially because many police don’t know how to separate a victim from someone in prostitution willingly.

“In many cases the woman feels so vulnerable and feels so afraid she doesn’t go and rat out the man in charge, she’s afraid he’s gonna beat her up or that’s the person who feeds her,” said Nebraska State Senator Amanda McGill.

She’s been working tirelessly to pass legislation to help with the problem.

She introduced and helped pass a bill that ups the prison sentence to maximum of 20 years. Before, a person convicted of pandering–coercing or forcing a person into prostitution–would only face a maximum of five years behind bars.

The bill calls for a task force to study trafficking in Nebraska and adds training for law enforcement and lawyers to teach them to separate prostitutes and victims.

The Polaris Project helped with the bill. It is a national organization working to end modern day slavery. It rates each state based on the type of legislation and services available to trafficking victims.

Nebraska currently sits at the second to worst rating.

“Nebraska has a good start, but there’s still room for improvement,” said Mary Ellison, policy director for the organization.

It’s too early to know how the new legislation could help improve Nebraska’s rating, but a high turnout at recent trafficking awareness events is a good sign.

“The number of people from the community that are interested in this issue is really stunning,” said Ellison.

State Senator Mcgill’s next goal is to help provide services to help victims in the state start a new life.

“It doesn’t do any good to identify the victims if they don’t have a safe place to stay,” she said. “There are a lot of barriers to good treatment right now,”

Bills adding services have been passed several times, but the Governor vetoed funding for the services several years in a row.

“I think part of the reason he was able to veto that money and not get it is that people don’t understand the vulnerability of these women and how widespread it is. It’s not just a North Omaha or South Omaha problem. It’s not even just an Omaha problem. It happens everywhere,” she said.

Burkle says the I-80 corridor is a prime area for trafficking.

“Anywhere there’s a major highway with truck stops next to it,” she said, especially near truck and rest stops.

Jane managed to escape her captor by tricking him into taking her to a friend’s house. She told him she had “pretty, skinny, tiny” friends inside.

It’s been five years since she last saw the man who forced her into sex slavery. The FBI has never found any leads on who he might be.

“I’m really really really really scared. I am so so so scared. I am scared. That’s why if I am walking somewhere, I don’t like to pass places where people don’t see,” she said. “My eyes are always passing, maybe I will see him. If I see him, I will know him. If he sees me, he will know me. (Laughs) even though I am fat now,”

Today she is working on her education. She is nearly finished with her GED and hopes to go on to college. Until then, she says she feels a sense of freedom knowing she can speak and read English.

“So nobody will fool us again, illiteracy is the one that made me suffer,”

She’s just hoping someone out there takes away something from her story.

“Forcing women to do something out of their wish–that is a killing. There is no difference with killing them. It is the same,”

The University of Nebraska Lincoln has done some extensive research into human trafficking. If you’d like to learn more a conference has been set for the weekend of October 11, 2012.

If you or somebody you know is trapped in a human trafficking situation, call the nation hotline at 1-888-373-7888

In April, a strike broke out at a seafood processing factory in Thailand’s southern province of Songkhla, where thousands of Burmese and Cambodian workers, living in small barracks and working in a nearby factory, process shrimp for export by a Bangkok-based company called Phatthana Seafood Co., Ltd… Some workers said they were provided inadequate toilet facilities and given insufficient bathroom breaks, obliging them at times to relieve themselves in corners of the factory. Far worse, labor organizers say, many of the migrant workers at the Songkhla facility found themselves in conditions amounting to debt bondage. Workers told organizers that many of them paid recruiters excessive placement and transport fees to get the jobs. Managers at the plant took portions of their wages to pay these debts, workers said, as well as various “fees” to the company for accommodation, utilities, and other necessities. Several workers said that before the strike they were promised 26 days of work per month, but often were only given 10 to 14 days of work, going unpaid when the factory was idle.
Some workers were receiving so little pay after deductions that they couldn’t afford sufficient food. Before the strike, they were reportedly catching minnows and snails for meals. Despite the legal requirement that workers be enrolled in Thailand’s social security system to receive health care, the company failed to sign the workers up, meaning workers had to pay out of pocket for any medical treatment for injuries or sickness.
Workers who wanted to leave found it difficult, organizers say, because their official documents, including work permits, health cards, ID cards, and passports, were reportedly confiscated and held by factory management to prevent workers from running away. New workers were told they would only get their documents back after their debts were paid off—a key criterion used in legal cases to prove human trafficking.
The conflict at the Songkhla facility escalated after management locked the workers out on April 9. Thai police fired gunshots in the air to disperse protesting workers. A few weeks later the workers reached a partial agreement with the company for modest pay increases, and received their passports back. The company agreed to provide additional toilets and pay part of the accommodation costs and debts to recruiters, but not utilities or health care. Some of the workers with smaller debts left. But the pre-existing debt conditions continued for most workers. Many today are still effectively in bondage.
Local labor organizers are skeptical that even the minor changes made are durable. “I am suspicious that they are making these changes right now only because they are being watched,” one labor researcher told us recently
The U.S. labor organization Change to Win has been raising awareness of abuses associated with factories like Phatthana, not just for the sake of workers there but also because one of the U.S. companies supplied by Phatthana is a continuing nemesis for the American labor movement: Walmart.
http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/09/17/walmarts-human-trafficking-problem

Common facilitators on which traffickers frequently rely include:
Hotels and Motels
Landlords
Labor brokers
Taxi and other driving services
Airlines, bus, and rail companies
Advertisers 
-Online websites like Craigslist.com and Backpage.com
-Phone books
-Alternative Newspapers (and some mainstream newspapers)
Banks and other financial services companies
In some cases, businesses are aware of their involvement in trafficking, and the profits they generate outweigh reservations they may have about their role. In other cases, businesses are unaware and find it difficult to know which of their customers are human traffickers.
http://www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/overview/the-facilitators

Common places where forced labor has been found in the United States include domestic servitude and small-scale “mom and pop” labor operations, to more large-scale operations such as farms and factories. Certain labor brokers that supply labor to multinational corporations have also been identified as an emerging type of labor traffickers. Sex trafficking includes commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), as well as every instance where an adult is in the sex trade as the result of force, fraud, or coercion. Sex trafficking occurs within numerous venues in the broader sex industry, commonly found in street prostitution, online escort services, residential brothels, and brothels disguised as massage businesses. Under U.S. and international law, commercially sexually exploited children found in the sex trade are considered to be victims of trafficking, even if no force or coercion is present.

Victims of human trafficking in the United States include U.S. citizens or foreign nationals, adults or minors, and men or women. Foreign-born victims in the U.S. may be either documented or undocumented.

Because human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries, the U.S. government and academic researchers are currently working on an up-to-date estimate of the total number of trafficked persons in the United States annually. With 100,000 children estimated to be in the sex trade in the United States each year, it is clear that the total number of human trafficking victims in the U.S. reaches into the hundreds of thousands when estimates of both adults and minors and sex trafficking and labor trafficking are aggregated.
http://www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/overview
New-York-City-Skyline

In August 2001, soldiers with the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Eritrea were purchasing ten-year-old girls for sex in local hotels.

– Before the arrival of 15,000 UN troops in Cambodia in 1991, there were an estimated 1,000 prostitutes in the capital. Currently, Cambodia’s illegal sex trade generates $500 million a year. No less than 55,000 women and children are sex slaves in Cambodia, 35 percent of which are younger than 18 years of age.

– Over 5,000 women and children have been trafficked from the Philippines, Russia and Eastern Europe and are forced into prostitution in bars servicing the U.S. Military in South Korea

The Cadena smuggling ring trafficked women, some as young as 14, from Mexico to Florida. The victims were forced to prostitute themselves with as many as 130 men per week in a trailer park. Of the $25 charged the “Johns” the women received only $3. The Cadena members kept the women hostage through threats and physical abuse. One woman was kept in a closet for 15 days for trying to escape. Some were beaten and forced to have abortions (the cost of which was added to their debt). The women worked until they paid off their debts of $2,000 to $3,000.

– Domestic servants in some countries of the Middle East are forced to work 12 to 16 hours a day with little or no pay, and subject to sexual abuse such as rape, forced abortions, and physical abuse that has resulted in death.

– Traffickers in many countries in West Africa take girls through voodoo rituals in which girls take oaths of silence and are often raped and beaten, prior to their leaving the country. They are also forced to sign agreements stating that, once they arrive in another country, they owe the traffickers a set amount of money. They are sworn to secrecy and given detailed accounts of how they will be tortured if they break their promise. Traffickers have taken women and young girls to shrines and places of cultural or religious significance; they remove pubic and other hair and then perform a ceremony of intimidation.
http://www.teamwmi.org/educational-information/human-trafficking-facts-figures/-britain

“South Africa is commonly regarded as the main country of destination for trafficked persons in the region,” SACTAP said in its brochure. “In many cases, women and children are lured to South Africa with promises of jobs, education or marriage, only to be sold and sexually exploited in the country’s major urban centres, or small towns and more rural environments.”
A 2004 report by South Africa’s Independent Newspapers alleged that “every year nearly 900,000 people are smuggled across borders as sex slaves, child labourers and illegal organ donors, with 75 percent of them going through South Africa.”

“Using numbers provided by informants in the sex industry and migration figures provided by Statistics South Africa, the authors calculate that between 850 and 1,100 women and children are trafficked to South Africa for the purpose of sexual exploitation annually,”

“They similarly estimate that at least 1,000 Mozambican women are trafficked into some kind of sexual exploitation in South Africa each year, earning traffickers approximately R1 million [$125,000] annually.”
http://www.irinnews.org/Report/80229/SOUTH-AFRICA-How-heavy-is-human-trafficking

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The most comprehensive inquiry into sex trafficking and off-street prostitution in the UK identified 17,000 migrants working in brothels.

Of these, about half – 9,000 – were from eastern Europe, of which police believe 400 had been trafficked.
The report, completed last year by the Association of Chief Police Officers after an investigation named Operation Acumen, found a further 4,128 women from eastern Europe, which they categorised as “vulnerable”. The classification included women whose experience the police concluded fell below the threshold of trafficking but were vulnerable to sexual exploitation in that they spoke little English, were overly reliant on their “controllers” and faced other barriers preventing them from exiting prostitution.
The police investigation detected another 5,000 women from eastern Europe working in brothels who were willing to work as prostitutes and could not be considered trafficked or vulnerable.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/feb/06/sex-traffick-romania-britain

Thousands of people are falling victim to human traffickers every year in the European Union but most member states have failed to implement tougher new laws agreed by the bloc to address the problem, the European Commission said on Monday.

The new laws, agreed in 2011 impose higher penalties on offenders, make it easier to prosecute across borders within the bloc and give better protection to victims.

Only six countries in the 27-member bloc have implemented the new legislation so far, the Commission said.

Trafficking victims are typically women and they are predominantly forced into sexual slavery, but also hard labor and criminal activity. Some have their organs removed.

Information released by the EU executive on Monday showed the number of identified trafficking victims increased by 18 percent between 2008 and 2010 to about 10,000, although that number likely represents a fraction of all victims.

“What we know is probably only the tip of the iceberg,” said Cecilia Malmstrom, the EU commissioner for home affairs.

“I am very disappointed to see that, despite these alarming trends, only a few countries have implemented the anti-trafficking legislation and I urge those who have not yet done so to respect their obligations.”

Most of the victims identified were citizens of Romania and Bulgaria, the two poorest members of the bloc. Neither country has implemented the new laws.

EU governments which do not implement common rules can face legal action and fines.

An estimated nearly 21 million people worldwide are victims of human trafficking, according to 2012 statistics from the International Labor Organization.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/15/us-eu-trafficking-idUSBRE93E0VF20130415

Annually 600,000 – 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked across international borders. Of these, 70% are women and 50% are children. The majority of these are forced into the commercial sex trade.

Each year approximately 117,000 Ukrainians are trafficked. The majority of the victims are women and children. Most women fall victim through phony job offers and are later forced into prostitution. Most orphans fall victim because of the lack of protection and oversight of these children as they leave state institutions.

Russia is a major source of women trafficked globally for sexual exploitation. It is estimated that 500,000 women from Central and Eastern Europe are involved in prostitution in Europe alone.
http://www.mannafreedom.com/get-informed-about-human-trafficking/what-is-human-trafficking/